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This 9th CRISE Summer Institute is a unique opportunity in the field of suicide prevention to explore the use of new technologies.  Researchers and practitioners from Quebec and around the world will be sharing their innovative approaches.  There will be three days of activities, including two days with plenary presentations (conferences and discussions), with simultaneous translation.  The other day will provide half-day and full day workshops for practitioners to address the specific skills needed to work with these new technologies.
Email: crise@uqam.ca
Phone: (514) 987-4832

To access the available PowerPoint presentations, click on the title.

Wednesday, May 30

Workshop #1 (in French)
9:00-16:00

Prof. Dr. Ad Kerkhof, Ph.D.
Professor of psychology, psychopathology and Suicide Prevention at Vrije Universitat Amsterdam
L’approche cognitive-béhaviorale pour traiter la rumination suicidaire par le biais de sites web
Abstract: Many suicidal patients do worry a lot about their reasons for contemplating suicide, about the meaning of life, about their failures, about their losses and disappointments, and they worry about their suicidal thoughts. Part of the suicidal urges are caused by the wish to stop this endless worrying and rumination. It is hypothesized that anti – worry exercises may help suicidal patients to decrease the amount of time a day that they are thinking of suicide, and therewith decrease the intensity of the reasons for contemplating suicides. In the workshop CBT techniques for worrying and rumination will be explained and applied to suicidal worrying. In the workshop participants are requested to present actual cases and engage in role playing, therewith train their skills in addressing persistent repetitive thoughts of suicide in patients.

Workshop #2 (in English and French)
9:00-12:00
Karolina Krysinska, Ph.D
Faculty of Psychology and Pedagogical Sciences, Leuven University, Belgium
Karl Andriessen, MSuicidology
Coordinator of the Suicide Prevention Project of the Mental Health Centres in Flanders-Belgium
How can we best help survivors after suicide via the Internet? What are good practices?
Abstract: Coming soon

Workshop #3 (in English)
9:00-12:00
Dr. Jan Mokkenstorm
Psychiatrist, Medical director at 113ONLINE, The Netherlands
How to start and run an interactive online help service for suicide people (and stay happy)
Abstract: The use of the internet to disseminate effective interventions may be one of the most promising approaches in preventing suicide on the individual as well as the population level. In practice however, organizations and clinicians have not taken the online road massively. To explore possibilities this workshop aims at identifying core issues and concerns (strategic, ethical/legal, technical and operational) in the successful development of e-mental health for suicidal people. Based on their own expertise in the field participants will be asked to reflect on the experiences of 113Online, the new Dutch online suicide prevention platform, and to generate ideas to develop or expand online helpservices, maybe even for severely suicidal people.

Workshop #4 (in French)
13:00-16:00
Prof. Xavier Pommereau
Psychiatrist, chief of the Pôle Aquitaine de l’Adolescent (Abadie Centre, Bordeaux University, France)
Techniques de médiation thérapeutique, des poupées et figurines remaniées à la création d’avatars numériques.
Abstract: Coming soon

Workshop #5 (in English)
13:00-16:00
Mary Drexler, MSW
Executive Director, CONTACT USA
Providing chat/SMS Based Emotional Support
Abstract: Coming soon

 

 

Thursday May 31

9:00-9:30
Brian L. Mishara, Ph.D.
Director, CRISE and professor, psychology department, UQÀM
Welcome and introduction to the problematic

 

 

 

9:30-10:30
Dr. Jan Mokkenstorm
Psychiatrist, Medical director for 113ONLINE, The Netherlands
113ONLINE : Education, help and intervention with people on the Internet
Abstract: Suicidal people are reluctant helpseekers. 113Online aims at lowering help seeking tresholds by offering a 24/7 online anonymous mental health care programme, including crisis support, guided self help, and online therapy. This programme is provided by professionals in close cooperation with volunteer staffed helplines by chat and telephone. In this presentation philosophy, structure, methods and preliminary results of 113Online are presented, including some of the dilemma's and problems we encountered implementing the online care programme.

10:45-11:45
Christine Thoër, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of social and public communication, UQÀM 
Expressing oneself, sharing and exchanging about suicide: nature and dynamics of the interactions in exchanges over the Internet
Abstract: Coming soon

 

13:45-14:15
Prof. Xavier Pommereau
Psychiatrist, Chief of the Pôle Aquitaine de l’Adolescent (Abadie Centre, University of Bordeaux, France)
Suicidal teens and numeric avatars : interest and modality of therapies using auto-representations
Abstract: Coming soon

 

14:15-15:15
Gillian Murphy, Ph.D.
Director of Standards, Training and Practices, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, USA
New media in suicide prevention; using chats and SMS
Abstract: Coming soon

 

 

15:30-16:30
Simon Hatcher, Ph.D.
Associate professor of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, New-Zealand
E-therapies in suicide prevention : what do they look like, do they work and what is the research agenda?
Abstract: Coming soon

 

Friday June 1

9:00-9:30
Danyelle Latreille
Clinical coordinator, Regional Suicide Resource, CSSS Laval
Overview of the situation in Quebec : questions and challenges for intervention
Abstract: Coming soon

 

9:30-10h30
Denis Normand
Vice-president, Technologies globales de l'information et Sécurité, SNC-Lavalin
Security on the Internet
Abstract: Coming soon

14:45-11:45
Brian L. Mishara, Ph.D.
Director CRISE, professor, psychology department, UQÀM
Ethics and websites inciting to suicide
Abstract: Coming soon

 

 

 

13:15-14:15
Réal Labelle, Ph.D.
Researcher at CRISE and at Fernand-Seguin Research Centre (Rivière-des-Prairies site), professor, psychology department, UQÀM
Innovation in using smartphones in suicide prevention
Abstract: Coming soon

 

 

 

14:15-15:15
Karl Andriessen, MSuicidology
Coordinator of the Suicide Prevention Project of the Mental Health Centres in Flanders-Belgium
Karolina Krysinska, Ph.D
Faculty of Psychology and Pedagogical Sciences, Leuven University, Belgium
Online help for survivors: what is available on Internet and recommendations to caregivers
Abstract: Coming soon

15:30-16:30
Prof. Dr. Ad Kerkhof, Ph.D.
Professor of psychology, psychopathology and Suicide Prevention at Vrije Universitat Amsterdam 
CBT approach to suicidal worrying using self-help websites
Abstract: Context : Many persons with suicidal thoughts are reluctant to seek help. A web-based intervention can reach those who are hesitant to go to face to face services. Although web-based interventions have been studied for mental health problems, no web-based intervention specifically aimed at reducing suicidal thoughts has been developed and evaluated.
Objective: To determine whether a web-based intervention can be effective in reducing suicidal thoughts.
Design, Setting and Participants: A randomized controlled trial comparing an unguided web-based self-help intervention for suicidal thoughts (n=116) with a waitlist control group (n=120) was conducted. Between October 2009 and November 2010 236 adult participants were enrolled. Assessments took place at baseline and 2, 4 and 6 weeks after baseline.
Intervention: Our intervention is based on the cognitive model, using mainly cognitive behavioral techniques. It consists of six modules, each taking one week to complete. Although no structural guidance is offered, participants can receive up to six automated motivating e-mails, and have the opportunity to pose questions on the website, which are answered in the FAQ section.
Main outcome measure: All measures were self-report. Primary outcome measure was suicidal thoughts, measured with the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS). Secondary outcomes measures were depressive symptoms, anxiety, hopelessness, worrying, and health status.
Results: Will be presented at the conference
Conclusions: Web-based self-help is more effective in reducing suicidal thoughts than a waitlist control group. Additional research is needed to confirm these results.

16:30-17:00
Conclusion

 

 
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UQAM - Universit� du Qu�bec � Montr�al  ›  Last updated : February 2006